February 2016 events in the excd.lab

1. In February we welcomed Dr Péter Rácz to Bristol and he’s started work on the VariKin-Usage corpus linguistics project.

2. In January Alarna and Fiona were working with Jamie Tehrani from Durham on a fairytales project.

3. The D-PLACE database is very near to release. In April, Fiona will be talking about D-PLACE at the European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association meeting in London.

4. Two further VariKin positions have been advertised: a PhD in Cultural Phylogenetics and a Postdoc in Kinship Concept Acquisition. See the People page for details.

5. Applications for the Quantitative Methods Spring School at Jena were launched.

6. We welcomed Evi Argyriou as a project assistant – she is collecting kinship term data from Dravidian and Athapaskan languages.

7. Fiona was in New Zealand in March, experiencing new kinship ties at a family wedding!

Funding opportunities to work in excd.lab

There are two upcoming calls for funding schemes that would allow postdoctoral researchers to come work with us at Bristol.

The first is the British Academy’s International Partnership and Mobility Scheme. These three-year and one-year awards are for research partnerships between scholars in the UK and scholars in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, Eurasia, South Asia, East and South-East Asia. The awards will allow for a number of different activities (see the link above) although you must be based at your present employing institution for the duration of the award. So – travel, training, workshops, collaboration. I’d be very keen on hearing from applicants who could add capability to the VariKin project.

The second is the Leverhulme Trust’s Early Career Fellowships. We have an internal selection process at Bristol that needs a draft application by early December, so please contact me now if you are interested. These Fellowships are for three years. I would be happy to host researchers interested in any aspect of cultural evolution, linguistic anthropology, or kinship. More broadly the Department has strengths in evolutionary anthropology and scientific archaeology.

 

 

 

origins of resistance to science

An intriguing piece in Science this week about the childhood origins of adult resistance to scientific ideas. It’s a review, not experimental, and as such doesn’t test any of the hypotheses directly. It’s also USA-centric without really delving into the particularities of the American situation, and there are no substantial further suggestions, but that might be space constraints. It’s worth a read.

Links

Found today while adding sites to the Link List at the side:

PhyloTaxis, a nifty visualisation thing, that gathers science news headlines and turns them into this geometric flash array.

Surname Profiler. A UCL GIS project which produces a spatial map of the frequency of your surname in the UK. The wonders of GIS! My surname increased in frequency quite dramatically in the last century, and according to this, is pretty much confined to English and (in a minor way) Irish persons – which makes sense, given that Ireland is where my dad’s father’s family are from.

The different categories at visualcomplexity have fascinating topics. I like this one: London Connections, which is a spatial representation of a social network of one person in London.

Am well impressed with the bloggers at ScienceBlogs. Am assuming that joining the hosting service requires some sort of proof of science blogging, which I should get further underway with before knocking on the door.

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